My Shame Is A Shapeshifter – part two

watercolor painting – by Sara

*See Part One here*

My shame is a shapeshifter. Its ever changing presence lurks nearby at all times. Like my shadow it feels almost a part of me, never missing a step as it creeps along by my side.
My shame has evil desires masked by a comforting and soothing facade. It knows me by name. It can sense what I need, and its conniving ways enable it to convince me that it holds the answers I require. Its constant presence is worn like a blanket, draping me in the kind of familiarity that I no longer question while it continues its work to change and steal more and more of me.

My shame understands that patience is a necessary component for its success. It knows when its strength is greatest and waits for those prime moments to slither out of the darkness to strike. When it senses an environment of joy, connection, or engagement it carefully retreats to the background, not in defeat but instead with a sense of knowing that it must patiently wait to resurface later in order to be most effective. While in waiting, my shame compiles all that it needs in the darkness of its lair, gathering each soul piercing ingredient required to overwhelm me when it chooses. I can feel the undercurrents of these preparations. I know it is there and feel powerless to stop it. I know that no matter how much I try to resist and counter it my shame is too clever to reveal its full plan.

My shame watches you. It is learning how to exist around you. It may reveal little morsels of its intentions to you – just enough to make you think it is possible to subvert it. But my shame smiles at these attempts as it hovers behind me with its dagger pressed firmly up against me. It dares you to step closer. It welcomes your attempts to pull me away from it. My shame will simply absorb and catalog your efforts to later assist with its mission when it is required. It knows that your help has limits. Your presence wonโ€™t always be there. Yet shame has unrestricted access to me. Your limits will become more fuel doused onto its fiery wrath when it finds me in solitude.

I have learned that naming shame can help to ease its strength. Calling it out by name shines a light on shame and makes it retreat back into its darkness. Its power wilts when this light can reach it. I feel the truth in this, and I try to offer myself this gift of relief by using my voice to dampen it. But my shame is learning too. Like a virus, it keeps shifting and adapting to grow in strength. It is finding new ways to maneuver in plain sight in the midst of a glaring light in its direction.

I need a new strategy. I need a new angle. I feel myself stumbling and submitting. I understand that there is no future beyond surrender, and this is not an option I wish to consider. But my shame has infiltrated my eyes, and I can’t seem to see a path forward from here. My shame is winning, and it knows this. I need to find a new way out.

7 thoughts on “My Shame Is A Shapeshifter – part two

  1. Oh, Sara, my heart is aching for you right now, my dear friend. I too know what it is like to have shame blossom over hope; yet I do also know what it is like to have hope blossom over and extinguish shame. Itโ€™s so hard sometimes. I wish you all the best and am sending you all my love and light. ๐Ÿ’–

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Shame is bloody awful and the worst part is it not even yours to carry. Shame is something thatโ€™s given to us weโ€™re not born with it. Naming it definitely helps at times. I hate how it sneaks in and makes you doubt stuff. Itโ€™s a dementor. Self compassion is hard to muster in the face of shame but I try and think of it a bit like Harry Potter and the Petronus. I need to cultivate the love inside me to wage against it so I can get a better look at it from a distance rather than it being inside me. Sending you hugs xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you ๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’—
      Being able to access that kind of perspective and distance from it is so important and yet nearly impossible at times.

      Like

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